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Story Of My Life and Other Nonsense

I like working noc shift but I hate it


theresplendentyouth:

Hahaha I appreciate a teacher who gives quiz questions like this. #byui #anatomyandphysiology

theresplendentyouth:

Hahaha I appreciate a teacher who gives quiz questions like this. #byui #anatomyandphysiology


thatfunnyblog:

 


i was expecting a dope catch but..

HE STARED DEATH IN THE FACE!!! HE FELT THE PAIN BEFORE IT EVEN MADE IMPACT.

thatfunnyblog:

 

i was expecting a dope catch but..

HE STARED DEATH IN THE FACE!!! HE FELT THE PAIN BEFORE IT EVEN MADE IMPACT.


wnycradiolab:

fastcodesign:

The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds
What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.
The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.
The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.
Read More>

Interesting approach, Balzac.

wnycradiolab:

fastcodesign:

The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds

What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.

The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.

The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.

Read More>

Interesting approach, Balzac.


It happens to everyone as they grow up. You find out who you are and what you want, and then you realize that people you’ve known forever don’t see things the way you do. So you keep the wonderful memories, but find yourself moving on.

Nicholas Sparks

ted:

Well, that was easy.

You just learned 8 Chinese words in the cutest way possible.

When TED speaker ShaoLan Hsueh tried to teach her children Chinese, she realized just how hard it is for new learners to grasp. So she created a series of illustrations to make the beautiful, often complex characters easier to remember. It makes learning Chinese … wait for it … Chineasy.

Try Chineasy for yourself and watch her full talk here »


The problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The danger of a single story (via ted)

ted:

This is a DNA Vending Machine.

Each of those little vials holds human DNA, with a collectible photo of the person who donated it. You can buy it just like you’d buy a Coke or a bag of chips, and then you can do…whatever. (What do you actually do with a sample of DNA?) 

TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo created the vending machine as an art installation. He gathered a bunch of his friends on Friday nights and taught them how to extract their own DNA — the weirdest/coolest dinner party idea of all time. (In the photos above, the floating white stuff is the DNA.) Then, with their permission, he sold it. 

Of course, there’s a bigger question behind all this: Who owns your DNA? And what should strangers or scientists be able to do with yours? Gabe wants to push people to think about the ethical and legal questions we’ll have to answer as access to biotechnology increases.   

What do you think, would you be willing to sell your DNA?

Watch the full talk here »


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